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Blog Entries tagged 'blog'

One Big Happy Family Excerpt on Storked! at Glamor.com

Chrissi Coppa, writer of the blog Storked, and author of the soon to be published memoir Rattled, excerpted asha bandele's piece on choosing to divorce her incarcerated husband and become a single mom, from the new book. The comments are wonderful. Please visit and add your voice. 

Chrissi on asha's essay:

"This essay is dynamic and piercing and I relate to the bones and guts of it. It is scary knowing that if I fall no one is there to catch me--that I have to break my own fall and catch JD in the process. My mind races, races, races at night. I have no one to talk to or ask questions to. I witness miraculous things daily--JD taking his pajamas off, for one, but I have no one to squeal, "Look, look!" while I point to JD with my camera in hand--I share these milestones with my son. It is enough and more...but I like Asha feel the unpredictable twinges of solitude and quiet and pressure to be on top all of the time because I have to be. It's enough to drive me to tears and sometimes it really does, but then I recover all over again--because I love my son. I love him tremendously and behind the occasional tear is 100 x in smiles and joy--an easy joy with no reason or force, just a peaceful full circle coming to all ends. It's seamless.

Do, do discuss.

February 12th, 2009

Malia and Sasha: Public or Private

Today's Root post:

I'm a little late to this conversation, but I feel compelled to weigh in on the question of whether the Obama children should go to public or private school. I truly, deeply, completely understand why some feel sending Malia and Sasha to a private school will indicate an "abandonment" of the public school system, but still and all I think this is an inappropriate, bordering on reckless, discussion.

First of all--the question reminds me of Obama's behind the scenes remark in Newsweek:

"So when Brian Williams is asking me about what's a personal thing that you've done [that's green], and I say, you know, 'Well, I planted a bunch of trees.' And he says, 'I'm talking about personal.' What I'm thinking in my head is, 'Well, the truth is, Brian, we can't solve global warming because I f–––ing changed light bulbs in my house. It's because of something collective'."

I don't think sending the girls to public school is going to solve the unbelievable decline of our schools. And I seriously doubt he will be less motivated to improve the public school system de facto because he and Michelle send their girls to a private school.

Then there is the quality of the DC public school system. They are working on it, and I have tremendous respect for the teachers and many excellent public schools, especially the charter schools, in DC, but the history is fraught with issues. I went to one of the best public schools on Capitol Hill when my father worked for the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare under Jimmy Carter, and let's just say it could have been better.

Which brings us to the question of giving your kids "less" on principle. It reminds me of parents who believe you shouldn't leave money to your children because they won't work hard or appreciate the benefits of self-reliance, which is fine. But what if that somehow compromises the stability of your children or grandchildren?

Aren't principles, if they undermine long-term viability and health, dysfunctional?

What troubles me about these conversations is the assumption Malia and Sasha are just like everyone else. They may be in some ways, but they are not in one very big way: they are the children of the President of the United States. There are massive security issues to be managed. Those kids need to be in the most controlled environment possible. That means contained campuses, administrative familiarity with similar situations, and all manner of other considerations.

Safety first. Principles second. Or, what about safety being the overriding principle? 

What do you think?

 

November 13th, 2008

The New Us

November 6th, 2008