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Blog Entries tagged 'future'

Grieving the loss of Ismael, Lama, and Hayya

And I am thinking about Ayda, and wondering what I or anyone else can do to help the mothers of murdered children everywhere. 

from the New York Times:

But there were several children in another intensive care unit on Tuesday. Among them was Ismael Hamdan, 8, who had severe brain damage as well as two broken legs, according to a doctor there. Earlier that day, two of his sisters, Lama, 5, and Hayya, 12, were killed.

“I prepared them breakfast that day in the garden,” said their mother, Ayda, 36. “They had the tea, bread and thyme. Lama wanted a second pita, but we all teased her saying, ‘Keep it for lunch.’ She told us, ‘Don’t worry, God will provide us with bread.’

“She made all of us laugh,” the mother said. “I cleaned after them and collected the garbage. Ismael volunteered to dump the garbage, but Hayya and Lama joined him. The garbage can is in front of the house, a five-minute walk away. All of a sudden I heard the news from a neighbor, and I ran barefoot to the hospital. A relative collected the bodies of Lama and Hayya on a donkey cart.

“The neighbors ran trying to save Ismael, who was the only one breathing,” she said. “They say my kids flew 40 meters before hitting the ground.”

Ismael died Wednesday night.

January 1st, 2009

House vs. Field Negro Controversy, from Italy's Corriere della Sera

November 21st, 2008

A journalist from Corriere de la Sera called yesterday with an urgent request for an interview about the Al-Qaeda claim that Obama is a house negro. My comments hit the first page--with full spread on page 3.

Translation below the Italian.

November 29th, 2008

Obama's One Thousand Pieces, The Guardian UK

November 7th, 2008

By Rebecca Walker

I can finally stop for a second. And breathe. The election wasn’t stolen.Our candidate is alive. We showed up, changed the world, and plan to get up tomorrow and do it again. We know this because Obama won and there is a whole lot of world left to change. We also know this because President-elect Obama has already sent his supporters an email requesting our suggestions on public policy. True to form, he expects our input to begin right now.

November 7th, 2008

The Truth with Jeff Johnson on BET: Masculinity and the Final Debate


Thoughts on masculinity, the final debate, and Obama.

October 14th, 2008

Hurt feelings "worse than pain"

For everyone who has ever been told their feelings don't matter; that they should shut up and be quiet; that at least they haven't been beaten; that they should just "get over it" and move on.

Hope you've recovered from the incredible DNC party last night. I'm planning to write a post on it today. Check back later.

Peace and love,
Rebecca

August 29th, 2008

It was so Summer 2008.

Hi beautiful people! Sorry to post this so late!

I know there's a lot to talk about. The miraculous Michael Phelps, inspiring Lolo Jones, and breathtakingly beautiful Huang Shansan and her fellow trampolinists, to start.

Then there is Georgia and Russia.

And, of course, the economy.

I went to the mall a few days ago to buy a bathing suit for Tenzin. It was so cheap! I looked at the tag. Made in China. Then I went to the farmer's market and bought ten ears of corn. It was so expensive! The farmer said, "Locally grown, costs more."

Today I went to make sure Tenzin was sleeping and not chasing geckos at naptime.

I opened his door and found a delirious, somersaulting, almost-four-year-old boy hard at work paper-clipping all of my credit, debit, gift, frequent flier, health insurance, and drivers license cards to assorted stuffed animals, blankets, and pieces of furniture.

It was a post-modern installation piece: a room full of debt, a house of cards. He had found my wallet and was tearing a hole in it. It was expressly American, it was my Visa to enlightenment. It was, "Money can't buy you love" and it was "Child paper-clipping your credit cards to rocking horse? Priceless." It was rich. It was tragic.

It was so August 2008. When an ear of corn cost two dollars.

I stood thinking about Georgia, the trampolinists, and the sixty-five dollars it was going to take to fill up my gas tank tomorrow. I thought about all the people with no gas tank to fill up. No corn to buy.

I thought about the interview Obama gave upon return from Hawaii.

When asked what to do about all the unspeakable horrors going on in our world, Barack said the most important thing we can do is talk about them, and acknowledge, in a forthright way, they exist. We can't pretend nothing is wrong. We need to be able to look, to allow, to let down our defenses so that we can see. So that we can feel, and move from there.

Which is what I think we all need to do right about now. Not so much that we totally lose it, but just enough so we don't totally lose it.

Things are not okay in the world, and they haven't been for a very, very long time. It's not pretty, but it's the truth. And we can't change what we won't look at, and we won't look at what we think we can't change, which means we have to either look or set our hair on fire.

And if we did that, who would take care of the children?

Power to the people.

Each and every one of us.

Love,

Rebecca

August 26th, 2008

Santi White, for Interview Magazine

August 4th, 2008

August 4th, 2008

The Best Woman for the Job May Be a Man

 
By Rebecca Walker
Special to CNN

Rebecca Walker is the founder of the Third Wave Foundation, and the author of four books, including her latest, "Baby Love." Read her blog on theroot.com.

Rebecca Walker is urging women to turn the page on gender-based feminism.

June 6th, 2008

San Miguel Atencion

Hey here's an interview I just did for the paper in San Miguel de Allende about the upcoming writer's conference. Hope someone out there comes up and says hi. This interview was with Gina Hyams, editor of the Searching for Mary Poppins:

1. What is your writing schedule like? Do you have a favorite place to write or any creativity-inducing rituals?

Since having my son, I have had to throw a lot of my ideas about where and when to write out the window. I now write anywhere I can charge my laptop: the bed, the sofa, a chair in the backyard. I also write in hotels more lately, and try to build a few extra days for writing into my lecture schedule. My other trick is to wait until I really know what I want and need to say. Then I add a few months onto that until I can't contain it anymore. The urgency makes me write faster.

2. You have been extremely brave about delving into and revealing your complex personal truths in your memoirs and you have paid dearly for doing so. You wrote in Baby Love that your mother was so furious about what you wrote in Black, White, and Jewish that she disinherited you. Was it worth it? Is it worth it?

Well, it certainly wasn't the best financial decision I've ever made! Because my mother is such a powerhouse in the industry (think Oprah and many, many others) and people take sides, the estrangement has had a serious impact on my career and the resources available to me.

Access aside, as millions of people know, my mother is a tremendous human being and I love and respect her deeply. The rub is that, like her, I'm a writer: my life is my material. It's an issue all writers deal with: Is it possible to tell my story without hurting others? What happens to the world of letters if writers only write what is acceptable? What is the point of writing if you can't be truthful?

Some of my favorite memoirists, women like Anais Nin, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Diane DiPrima, Marguerite Duras, Susanna Kaysen, bell hooks, Lucy Grealy, asha bandele and others, didn't write what made everyone comfortable. They wrote what they needed to write, and the truth of their expression stands the test of time. I hope my work does the same.

So I guess that's a yes. It is worth it. And the cost is tremendous. I often tell writers in my workshops that their biggest fear about telling their story can come true: you can lose the people you love the most. But, as many of those same writers like to tell me, the opposite is also true: you can become closer to the people you love; telling your story can be a cathartic place of healing. I thought that would be true for me and my family. So far, not so much. But there is still time. I'll never close the door.

3. You have edited three non-fiction anthologies and contributed to at least twenty others. Why do you think anthologies as a genre became so popular and do you think the publishing trend is over? What is your new anthology about and when will it be out? I hear there is a local author in it.


The first anthology I read was This Bridge Called My Back by the late Chicana writer Gloria Anzaldua, and my all-time favorite is We Are the Stories We Tell. The genre endures because it fulfills a human longing to see the world from different points of view, all at once. And then there is the fact that collections are like parties for introverts: you meet the most fascinating people without having to leave the house. It's the original virtual community.

My new anthology is about new family configurations. It is called Walk This Way: Introducing the New American Family. It's about all the ways people are living these days: from birthing at home without a midwife, living polyamorously, and inviting the nanny to be a full-fledged family member, to co-housing, transracial adoption, and intercultural ex-pat life. SMdA resident Susan McKinney de Ortega is covering that last topic, and I'm thrilled to include her essay about moving to San Miguel, falling in love and starting what to some may seem like a non-traditional family.

4. Have you been in San Miguel de Allende before? If so, what is the first experience you look forward to having (place to go, etc.) upon each return?

This will be my first trip to San Miguel de Allende, though my mother owns a house in Mexico and I've spent over two decades going back and forth: the country is in my blood. I'm looking forward to speaking Spanish, a language I love, and eating carne asada with beans and rice. I'm looking forward to the light, the warmth of the people, and the focus on family rather than consumerism. I'm looking forward to architectural beauty and diversity. And of course, I am looking forward to meeting some wonderful writers.
December 11th, 2007

Ka'iulani: The Highest Point of Heaven

Hi,

Since I've been living in Hawaii, I have become even more aware of the struggles of Hawaiian people in the face of "statehood." I have been particularly inspired by the half Hawaiian and half Scottish Princess Ka'iulani, heir apparent to the Hawaiian throne when the US declared Hawaii a protectorate.

The video is very moving and provides, in just eight minutes, a very good overview of the final years of Hawaiian independence. For even more info (and an image of one of Princess Ka'iulani's beautiful paintings), read her story on Wikipedia.

Much aloha,
Rebecca

October 16th, 2007