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February 4. Occidental College: ARE YOU BLACK ENOUGH?

In conversation with my dear friend and fellow writer in the struggle, Danzy Senna...

January 26th, 2016

Jaipur Literary Festival: Rebecca Walker on Why Art Matters

JLF

A wonderful weekend.  We are looking forward to #JLF in #Bhutan! 

September 24th, 2015

Between the Lines: Reading at the Schomburg

July 13th, 2015

The novel. Now being adapted for film with Madonna directing.

“I want to say Adé reads like a memoir, but this heartbreaking, poetic tale of romance versus reality does more than that: it reads like truth. Lush, sensual, seductive, Adéis written with as much love as the story it tells.”

–MAT JOHNSON, author of Pym

“In luminous, dreamlike prose, Rebecca Walker has written more than a love story: Adé explores the difficulty of fleeing one's origins, of relinquishing privilege, even in the name of love.”

—DANZY SENNA, author of You Are Free and Caucasia

“Brief and intense, Adé is a surprise gem—a sensuous feast of food, sex, danger and the life of awakened senses from one of our most celebrated nonfiction writers. A lyrical novel as timeless as Marguerite Duras’ The Lover.”

—MOLLY PEACOCK, author of The Paper Garden:  An Artist Begins Her Life's Work at 72

“If you've ever dared to love outside the predictable geography of your origins, or wished you had, this beautiful novel will grab your heart and not let go.”

—BLISS BROYARD, author of One Drop: My Father's Hidden Life-A Story of Race and Family Secrets

Pre-Order Here.  

July 12th, 2015

NPR: My Review of Widow Basquiat

 

 Much has been written about Jean-Michel Basquiat, the childlike savant and startlingly brilliant neo-expressionist who went down in a ball of heroin, cocaine and rage before his prime — before he could see his paintings sell at Christie's for $49 million, before he was compared to Picasso and de Kooning. Since his death in 1988, he has been immortalized in countless museum catalogues and even more Ph.D theses, and rendered larger than life on the silver screen by none other than the king of the eighties art world himself, Julian Schnabel.

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July 13th, 2014

The Future Masculine in the Work of Kehinde Wiley: Brooklyn Museum Catalogue Essay

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June 13th, 2014

Black Cool in development for docu-series at BET with Akil Productions

 

Buy it here.  

Listen on Talk of the Nation

Follow on Twitter.  

Join on Facebook

December 22nd, 2013

The Paris Review: My Window on the World

windowshave been looking out this window for three years. I have stared out of these rectangular panes full of hope and also despair, giddy with inspiration to connect and overtaken by a throbbing desire to disengage. I suppose this is what writing is to me: gripping the rope that swings between reaching out and pulling in.

But whatever my mood, I always love the light beyond this window. I love the quiet. I love my two empty chairs, sentinels awaiting their visitors, open to the promise of more. I feel at home in this spot, on this road to the small village of Hana, on this tiny piece of rock in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. I love the rain that pours down, thunderous and crashing, before sunshine, harsh and stunning, pierces through once again. 

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July 19th, 2013

Sugar In My Bowl.

I am sooo loving being a part of this incredible collection. 

From Kirkus:

Award-winning writer and high-flying sexual truth-teller Jong (Love Comes First, 2009, etc.) partners with 28 collaborators to create this fierce and refreshingly frank collection of personal essays, short fiction and cartoons celebrating female desire.

The approaches to the still-taboo topic of feminine sexuality—at least, for women writers seeking approbation from the literary establishment—are, as Jong notes, “as varied as sexuality itself” and as exuberantly diverse as the contributors themselves. They range from such emerging talents as Elisa Albert and J.A.K. Andres to such luminaries as Rebecca Walker, Eve Ensler, Susan Cheever, Anne Roiphe and Fay Weldon, and represent a multiethnic, multigenerational swath of some of the finest women writers in the United States.

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July 5th, 2013

Marie Claire: My First Girl

 

 
GROWING UP, my sexuality, like for many, was shaped by the culture I lived and breathed, and heterosexuality was pretty much the only meal served at the Table of Sexual Orientation. Ken and Barbie did not have lovers of the same sex. Denise did not fret to Daddy Huxtable about her girl crush. From the moment I grew breasts, people asked whether I wanted to be a lawyer or an astronaut when I grew up, and if I had a boyfriend. No one, not ever, not once, asked if I had a girlfriend. If they had, I might have considered the possibility. But they didn't, so I didn't, either. The thought never crossed my mind. Which might explain why, the first time I fell in love with a woman, I was completely thrown.
 
I was 21 years old, four months out of college, three months out of a relationship with a boy I thought I was going to marry, and employed at a nonprofit. One evening, I was working a fundraiser at an awards ceremony for women in the film industry. A possible suitor, male or female, was as far from my mind as the salt lakes in the Himalayas. And yet, as I strode across the exquisitely appointed room toward yet another philanthropist, I bumped into a very beautiful woman.
 
She was a celebrity who shall go forever unnamed, but I will say that she was statuesque and confident, and her skin glowed with health, wealth, and carefully applied bronzer. I sputtered and apologized for almost knocking her down. She smiled and touched my arm, but I was mortified and dashed into the women's room. I had never felt attracted to a woman before. It was as if my whole view of what was sexy, sensual, and possible had just turned on its axis.

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June 22nd, 2013